My New TEDx Talk: One Simple Method to Learn Any Language

Funny story about this TEDx.

We had decided, as you’ll see from the video, to open with a question to the audience. We wanted to know how many people had put effort into learning a language, but they still can’t hold conversations in it. We were expecting about half the room to raise their hand.

When we presented, nearly everyone raised their hand. Some people put up both hands.

Clearly, learning languages is a problem for many people. We believe we know what the solution is, and it’s actually quite simple. In the above TEDx, Vat and I discuss what we discovered about language learning, from learning four languages in a year.

Special thanks to Benny Lewis, both for inspiration about this project and for making a brief appearance in the video!

  • Cougar_B

    I’m not in a position to learn a new human language, so I’m going to adopt your approach. I’ve written six apps in jQuery and a navigation system in PHP, and both languages provided a humongous challenge to me, since I’m neither a programmer by experience nor interest. All of this was a means to an end.

    So I’m going to make a challenge for myself that every day, I’ll spend some time reading code–not books about code. I’ll start with my own apps and PHP. I don’t know where I’ll get the rest. Some books have sample code all in one place–that’s where I’ll focus. See what I can suss out, maybe looking things up until I understand the samples. Probably there are a lot of code repositories that I can find and read.

    I have a dozen projects that have been on hold for a long time. Maybe I’ll just start writing them when I feel like I’ve learned enough. This is how I handled the first coding I did. I chose a project, started coding it, and looked up things. Yeah, I also read books, but during the coding phase, I created projects that were way beyond my level of expertise or knowledge and still are.

    Will I keep this intention? I have a lot of other intentions that also divide my efforts, so I don’t know how well I will, but I’ll try. I’ll track it using the graphs available with the Google online spreadsheets. I hope it works. It will be worth the trial, because my six apps are intended to catapult me to a place where I can use a framework that I build to put the next 325 apps I have planned in a database. Catapults don’t work when you’re standing still, do they?

  • Cougar_B

    I’m not in a position to learn a new human language, so I’m going to adopt your approach. I’ve written six apps in jQuery and a navigation system in PHP, and both languages provided a humongous challenge to me, since I’m neither a programmer by experience nor interest. All of this was a means to an end.

    So I’m going to make a challenge for myself that every day, I’ll spend some time reading code–not books about code. I’ll start with my own apps and PHP. I don’t know where I’ll get the rest. Some books have sample code all in one place–that’s where I’ll focus. See what I can suss out, maybe looking things up until I understand the samples. Probably there are a lot of code repositories that I can find and read.

    I have a dozen projects that have been on hold for a long time. Maybe I’ll just start writing them when I feel like I’ve learned enough. This is how I handled the first coding I did. I chose a project, started coding it, and looked up things. Yeah, I also read books, but during the coding phase, I created projects that were way beyond my level of expertise or knowledge and still are.

    Will I keep this intention? I have a lot of other intentions that also divide my efforts, so I don’t know how well I will, but I’ll try. I’ll track it using the graphs available with the Google online spreadsheets. I hope it works. It will be worth the trial, because my six apps are intended to catapult me to a place where I can use a framework that I build to put the next 325 apps I have planned in a database. Catapults don’t work when you’re standing still, do they?

  • Mackenzie U

    Great video. I agree that forcing yourself to use your foreign language is a very important to learning it. Another benefit of this method, if you are stubborn enough with it, is that people will eventually resign to speaking with you in that language, even if they were originally very adamant about speaking English with you. Just remember to pay it forward to another person another time!

    Where I disagree a bit is that it’s good to make mistakes. Obviously they will happen inevitably and frequently, but every time they are made without rectifying feedback, that mistake is ingrained. So mistakes are best made in an environment that is corrective. Although some will do it from time to time, people generally do not want to correct your errors — even with encouragement to do so — if they succeed at understanding what you are trying to say. However, you can still learn by example, and this is why I think it is especially important to seek out native speakers to speak with. I have had French relationships with Anglophones that resulted in some helpful practice, but also in a lot of errors becoming crystalized.

    I liked the analogy with the waves. In my experience, the ride gets bumpy again further down the road when you try to get past just being understood, into the realm of speaking correctly — gramatically and contextually. As you said, learning a language isn’t harder for adults than children in the early stages, but it is harder in the later stages.

  • Mackenzie U

    Great video. I agree that forcing yourself to use your foreign language is a very important to learning it. Another benefit of this method, if you are stubborn enough with it, is that people will eventually resign to speaking with you in that language, even if they were originally very adamant about speaking English with you. Just remember to pay it forward to another person another time!

    Where I disagree a bit is that it’s good to make mistakes. Obviously they will happen inevitably and frequently, but every time they are made without rectifying feedback, that mistake is ingrained. So mistakes are best made in an environment that is corrective. Although some will do it from time to time, people generally do not want to correct your errors — even with encouragement to do so — if they succeed at understanding what you are trying to say. However, you can still learn by example, and this is why I think it is especially important to seek out native speakers to speak with. I have had French relationships with Anglophones that resulted in some helpful practice, but also in a lot of errors becoming crystalized.

    I liked the analogy with the waves. In my experience, the ride gets bumpy again further down the road when you try to get past just being understood, into the realm of speaking correctly — gramatically and contextually. As you said, learning a language isn’t harder for adults than children in the early stages, but it is harder in the later stages.

  • Dan J

    Hey Scott, great talk and I completely agree. I do have one question for you though that maybe you could shed some light on. I plan on taking a year abroad in Colombia in January as part my degree and a way to improve my Spanish. I have been studying it in a classroom for 2 years and would consider myself to be an intermediate level speaker. As part of my program I can choose whether to take my classes abroad in English or in Spanish (I’m technically required to take 2 classes in Spanish but I could just take Spanish language classes). They would all be business related classes like finance, marketing, etc. My question is, which language do you think I should study in? I don’t want to lose out on grades by studying in Spanish, but I of course would love to become fluent in Spanish and learn quickly by being immersed. Do you think it would be enough to only speak Spanish outside of school?

  • Dan J

    Hey Scott, great talk and I completely agree. I do have one question for you though that maybe you could shed some light on. I plan on taking a year abroad in Colombia in January as part my degree and a way to improve my Spanish. I have been studying it in a classroom for 2 years and would consider myself to be an intermediate level speaker. As part of my program I can choose whether to take my classes abroad in English or in Spanish (I’m technically required to take 2 classes in Spanish but I could just take Spanish language classes). They would all be business related classes like finance, marketing, etc. My question is, which language do you think I should study in? I don’t want to lose out on grades by studying in Spanish, but I of course would love to become fluent in Spanish and learn quickly by being immersed. Do you think it would be enough to only speak Spanish outside of school?

  • Mekirin

    same story, different version:

    Basically, agree on the No English rule, but here’s the thing:
    1) Learned french part-time for 3 years, cannot speak. Ashamed to speak. Now share an office with a native speaker, tried to speak with her once. As soon as she said “WHAT??” my confidence level dropped, and that was my last attempt to speaking to her in French.
    2) I lived in Cyprus where the locals speak English, even if you speak fluent Greek, they would think it’s ridiculous for foreigners to be able to be fluent in their difficult language, so even if you are fluent, they speak to you in English. So, lived there 4 years, learned A1 Greek and gave up.
    3) moved to Austria, in 3 months I am able to speak basic German (plus classes) that I couldn’t with my French. Why? because I was/am forced to. Common people here DON’T speak English (even though some of them elected to learn it in school). From situation (1) being ashamed to speak, to (3) being ashamed not to be able to speak. i couldn’t understand what the cashiers were saying to me at local supermarkets at check-outs, long line of people behind looking at me. The key? Ashamed. I hired a cleaning lady who doesn’t speak English, I’m not sure if she understood what I was telling her to do (as I realized I had to repeat again when she didn’t do it), but I felt happy about myself cos I TRIED. And because she couldn’t reply in English saying my German sucks, unlike my french colleague who could, I was feeling good about myself, even though I was making mistakes.

    so, as adult language learner, the “feeling good” and “feeling ashamed” are the two feelings that decide if we’re going to succeed or not. I am making progress in A1 in German than my B1 in French could not. Also because German curriculum is much more advanced even for A1 level compared to Greek & French – and that French course books almost always exclusively want to talk about topics of “vacance” and “music” (I’m a music idiot) which i don’t have much to contribute. I don’t find it very practical in daily conversation.

    One thing though, if I insisted on speaking on the phone to the customer service guy about my broken waschmachine in English, all of them would probably hung up on me immediately (already happened many times cos most of them couldn’t understand English, frustrated as hell. You need to hit a jackpot to find someone who speaks fluently). So I had to use English, even then I was told (in German, from what I gathered was the meaning): “if you want to speak English, go call some countries that speak it, here is xxx!”. So, there you go. Rude customer service to English-speaking customers, works too.

  • Mekirin

    same story, different version:

    Basically, agree on the No English rule, but here’s the thing:
    1) Learned french part-time for 3 years, cannot speak. Ashamed to speak. Now share an office with a native speaker, tried to speak with her once. As soon as she said “WHAT??” my confidence level dropped, and that was my last attempt to speaking to her in French.
    2) I lived in Cyprus where the locals speak English, even if you speak fluent Greek, they would think it’s ridiculous for foreigners to be able to be fluent in their difficult language, so even if you are fluent, they speak to you in English. So, lived there 4 years, learned A1 Greek and gave up.
    3) moved to Austria, in 3 months I am able to speak basic German (plus classes) that I couldn’t with my French. Why? because I was/am forced to. Common people here DON’T speak English (even though some of them elected to learn it in school). From situation (1) being ashamed to speak, to (3) being ashamed not to be able to speak. i couldn’t understand what the cashiers were saying to me at local supermarkets at check-outs, long line of people behind looking at me. The key? Ashamed. I hired a cleaning lady who doesn’t speak English, I’m not sure if she understood what I was telling her to do (as I realized I had to repeat again when she didn’t do it), but I felt happy about myself cos I TRIED. And because she couldn’t reply in English saying my German sucks, unlike my french colleague who could, I was feeling good about myself, even though I was making mistakes.

    so, as adult language learner, the “feeling good” and “feeling ashamed” are the two feelings that decide if we’re going to succeed or not. I am making progress in A1 in German than my B1 in French could not. Also because German curriculum is much more advanced even for A1 level compared to Greek & French – and that French course books almost always exclusively want to talk about topics of “vacance” and “music” (I’m a music idiot) which i don’t have much to contribute. I don’t find it very practical in daily conversation.

    One thing though, if I insisted on speaking on the phone to the customer service guy about my broken waschmachine in English, all of them would probably hung up on me immediately (already happened many times cos most of them couldn’t understand English, frustrated as hell. You need to hit a jackpot to find someone who speaks fluently). So I had to use English, even then I was told (in German, from what I gathered was the meaning): “if you want to speak English, go call some countries that speak it, here is xxx!”. So, there you go. Rude customer service to English-speaking customers, works too.

  • Ayesha

    Completely great TED talk. And we need one on how to learn computer programming languages without paying exorbitant sums! ๐Ÿ™‚

    http://www.ayeshajamal.com

  • Ayesha

    Completely great TED talk. And we need one on how to learn computer programming languages without paying exorbitant sums! ๐Ÿ™‚

    http://www.ayeshajamal.com

  • ๅ‚…ๆฒ™้• 

    So excited to see Scott again on TEDx! Hope to share this video with my friends in China~

  • ๅ‚…ๆฒ™้• 

    So excited to see Scott again on TEDx! Hope to share this video with my friends in China~

  • Liisa R

    Hey Dan,

    I had a somewhat similar situation a few years ago, when I went to Germany as an exchange student, only I had no option of choosing between classes in English and classes in German – there were only classes in German for my subject; also, I’ve studied German somewhat longer than you Spanish.

    From my experience – you are right, I did get worse grades than at home, but for me the grades weren’t that important, so I didn’t mind. I found having courses held in German very useful for language learning – it widened my vocabulary in the field I study, otherwise I doubt I would’ve practiced that vocabulary elsewhere. But, as I said, it is harder to study and understand everything said in the lectures, so it’s your choice in the end.

    Of course if it’s possible, I’d recommend taking for example just half of your courses (the ones you expect to be easier) in Spanish and others in English.

  • Liisa R

    Hey Dan,

    I had a somewhat similar situation a few years ago, when I went to Germany as an exchange student, only I had no option of choosing between classes in English and classes in German – there were only classes in German for my subject; also, I’ve studied German somewhat longer than you Spanish.

    From my experience – you are right, I did get worse grades than at home, but for me the grades weren’t that important, so I didn’t mind. I found having courses held in German very useful for language learning – it widened my vocabulary in the field I study, otherwise I doubt I would’ve practiced that vocabulary elsewhere. But, as I said, it is harder to study and understand everything said in the lectures, so it’s your choice in the end.

    Of course if it’s possible, I’d recommend taking for example just half of your courses (the ones you expect to be easier) in Spanish and others in English.

  • Dan J

    Great, thanks for the advice! You make a really good point about expanding vocabulary in your field of study; I’m sure that there are a lot of “business” words don’t come up in regular conversation that would be very useful for me to know. I’m also very fortunate in that the grades I receive abroad will not affect my GPA at home, however if I want to ever go to grad school they will matter and this is what I’m worried about. Anyway, I’m sure I’ll figure it out, thanks again for your insight!

  • Dan J

    Great, thanks for the advice! You make a really good point about expanding vocabulary in your field of study; I’m sure that there are a lot of “business” words don’t come up in regular conversation that would be very useful for me to know. I’m also very fortunate in that the grades I receive abroad will not affect my GPA at home, however if I want to ever go to grad school they will matter and this is what I’m worried about. Anyway, I’m sure I’ll figure it out, thanks again for your insight!

  • Wayne Jones

    Thanks for sharing your experience. I know a lot of people have romantic ideas about learning a language, the amount of times people say “I would like to do that one day” when they discover I am learning a language is quite surprising, but had no idea the dropout rate is around 94%.
    A couple of points that occur to me is that in order to learn a language you have to become the dumbest person in the room again and that is uncomfortable, and for adults especially, an assault on the ego. We often judge people by their command of the language and so to go from an intelligent, articulate person in your native tongue to a bumbling incoherent grown-up talking baby gibberish is a hard process to endure.
    I also wonder if it comes into play with Dr Dweck’s fixed mindset and growth mindset personalities. The first couple of lessons are fun and easy and progress is swift (a convex learning curve) and then it flattens and then it gets downright hard (a concave learning curve) going from basic conversational to fluent.
    I have been learning French for over a year and about mid B1 level so I can talk to a French person on the internet for about an hour with rarely requiring a word of English these days, but it’s pretty basic everyday water-cooler conversation – we are not solving any of the world’s problems when we chat.
    A friend wanted to learn French and so she sat in on the conversation and was surprised when she heard me speaking with him that I made so many mistakes – which he politely corrects – and it put her off entirely. I think she was expecting to hear someone talking like we were in a French movie or cafe. She couldn’t handle not being right – the fixed mindset that Dweck refers to.
    Always enjoy the blog. All the best from Australia ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Wayne Jones

    Thanks for sharing your experience. I know a lot of people have romantic ideas about learning a language, the amount of times people say “I would like to do that one day” when they discover I am learning a language is quite surprising, but had no idea the dropout rate is around 94%.
    A couple of points that occur to me is that in order to learn a language you have to become the dumbest person in the room again and that is uncomfortable, and for adults especially, an assault on the ego. We often judge people by their command of the language and so to go from an intelligent, articulate person in your native tongue to a bumbling incoherent grown-up talking baby gibberish is a hard process to endure.
    I also wonder if it comes into play with Dr Dweck’s fixed mindset and growth mindset personalities. The first couple of lessons are fun and easy and progress is swift (a convex learning curve) and then it flattens and then it gets downright hard (a concave learning curve) going from basic conversational to fluent.
    I have been learning French for over a year and about mid B1 level so I can talk to a French person on the internet for about an hour with rarely requiring a word of English these days, but it’s pretty basic everyday water-cooler conversation – we are not solving any of the world’s problems when we chat.
    A friend wanted to learn French and so she sat in on the conversation and was surprised when she heard me speaking with him that I made so many mistakes – which he politely corrects – and it put her off entirely. I think she was expecting to hear someone talking like we were in a French movie or cafe. She couldn’t handle not being right – the fixed mindset that Dweck refers to.
    Always enjoy the blog. All the best from Australia ๐Ÿ™‚

  • The the no-English rule does make sense in terms of explaining why kids learn faster. It’s not because they’re innately better at learning languages. It’s that they have the no-English rule by default!

  • Ayomide Adebayo

    The the no-English rule does make sense in terms of explaining why kids learn faster. It’s not because they’re innately better at learning languages. It’s that they have the no-English rule by default!

  • Ada Teng

    Hey Scott,

    Thanks for sharing this amazing experience in learning four languages within a year!

    Besides the no-English rule, here is another tip: I feel it’s important to correct pronunciations and the accent, especially when we are not able to travel to the country to talk to native speakers.

    Why? It’ll be easier for others to understand us, and therefore improve our confidence. I saw Mekirin’s comments: “As soon as she said ‘WHAT??’ my confidence level dropped, and that was my last attempt to speaking to her in French.” We can’t always live on our self-motivation. I still remember one of your previous blogs about permanent habits and I believe learning a language is really not a short-term project (I bet you still want to learn and use the four languages that you’ve learned in the future). So we need rewards to reduce the intrinsic cost of our foreign language habit. How do we maximize the rewards with less effort? We simply want to be easily understood and also be able to understand others. Pronunciations are critical in this case, especially when we practice with other language learners when we cannot talk to native speakers.

    Another thing about accent is that it is the music of a language. Children not only use the no-English rule by default but also are good at imitating the sounds they hear. Although they cannot speak English fluently at first, they capture and remember the accent just as you two did when you were traveling. Living in a non-English speaking country, I found it really frustrating when I basically couldn’t understand English without transcripts several months ago. After all when we are not traveling, the time that we are exposed to the language we want to learn is limited. But everything miraculously changed after I read a book about the American accent. I suddenly realized the exclusively innate nature of children can be taught and learned. My previous frustration was all because of the way people usually use English is completely different from the way I always tried to speak English. After knowing about the intonation, rythmn, stress, word connections, etc, I found the beauty, the natural flow in English. It turns out that I fall in love with the language, which greatly helps me with my future learning. It finally feels right when I talk to others.

    P.S. I plan to learn Spanish in a week. Your post is really inspiring! Thanks.

  • Ada Teng

    Hey Scott,

    Thanks for sharing this amazing experience in learning four languages within a year!

    Besides the no-English rule, here is another tip: I feel it’s important to correct pronunciations and the accent, especially when we are not able to travel to the country to talk to native speakers.

    Why? It’ll be easier for others to understand us, and therefore improve our confidence. I saw Mekirin’s comments: “As soon as she said ‘WHAT??’ my confidence level dropped, and that was my last attempt to speaking to her in French.” We can’t always live on our self-motivation. I still remember one of your previous blogs about permanent habits and I believe learning a language is really not a short-term project (I bet you still want to learn and use the four languages that you’ve learned in the future). So we need rewards to reduce the intrinsic cost of our foreign language habit. How do we maximize the rewards with less effort? We simply want to be easily understood and also be able to understand others. Pronunciations are critical in this case, especially when we practice with other language learners when we cannot talk to native speakers.

    Another thing about accent is that it is the music of a language. Children not only use the no-English rule by default but also are good at imitating the sounds they hear. Although they cannot speak English fluently at first, they capture and remember the accent just as you two did when you were traveling. Living in a non-English speaking country, I found it really frustrating when I basically couldn’t understand English without transcripts several months ago. After all when we are not traveling, the time that we are exposed to the language we want to learn is limited. But everything miraculously changed after I read a book about the American accent. I suddenly realized the exclusively innate nature of children can be taught and learned. My previous frustration was all because of the way people usually use English is completely different from the way I always tried to speak English. After knowing about the intonation, rythmn, stress, word connections, etc, I found the beauty, the natural flow in English. It turns out that I fall in love with the language, which greatly helps me with my future learning. It finally feels right when I talk to others.

    P.S. I plan to learn Spanish in a week. Your post is really inspiring! Thanks.

  • Scott Young

    Study in Spanish. Biggest mistake I made when going to France was to study in English.

  • Scott Young

    Study in Spanish. Biggest mistake I made when going to France was to study in English.

  • Scott Young

    Mistakes do get ingrained, but they can also be rectified. I don’t buy the paranoia about initial mistakes becoming so calcified the person can’t change them later. I can count dozens, if not hundreds of examples in my various languages where I persistently made a beginner mistake which I would never make now.

    Quantity of practice is what matters. Reducing quantity of practice in order to avoid making repeat mistakes in your speech is a bad idea, in my opinion.

  • Scott Young

    Mistakes do get ingrained, but they can also be rectified. I don’t buy the paranoia about initial mistakes becoming so calcified the person can’t change them later. I can count dozens, if not hundreds of examples in my various languages where I persistently made a beginner mistake which I would never make now.

    Quantity of practice is what matters. Reducing quantity of practice in order to avoid making repeat mistakes in your speech is a bad idea, in my opinion.

  • Dan

    Tried doing just that with a couple of languages (a few years before the internet was on computers). Didn’t reach fluency. Not by a long shot. I could get by in those languages, but could never get to the next level

  • Dan

    Tried doing just that with a couple of languages (a few years before the internet was on computers). Didn’t reach fluency. Not by a long shot. I could get by in those languages, but could never get to the next level

  • Jeff

    In order to learn any language on your own, one should follow a method. The method will be outlined here but it is described in more details on the website www”.”learnlanguagesonyourown”.”com

    It is a method that I have used myself and it worked great.

    1. Determine which language to learn
    This can sound obvious to some of you, but in fact, it is a detail that is overlooked by many. When learning a language for a specific purpose, it is best to learn the variety of the language best suited to fulfill this purpose. When talking about a variety, what is usually meant is a dialect of a language, although it can be more specific than that. When learning Arabic, do you know if you should learn Maghrebi Arabic or Gulf Arabic?

    2. Find out what resources are available to you
    When choosing to learn a language, it is handy to know if you are going to have native speakers to practice with and if you’re easily going to find some websites which will help you learn the language.

    3. The time and difficulty
    Another factor that is often overlooked, the time factor. To be successful in learning a language, you need to be realistic in the amount of time you have to learn it and the amount of time it takes.

    The time factor is in direct relation to the difficulty factor. During this step, it is important to assess the level of difficulty of a language. This level of difficulty has to do with the similarities that are shared between the language(s) you speak and the language you want to learn. You need to ask yourself, are the languages related ? What features do they have in common and which features they do not and which might be difficulty to learn?

    4. Practice using Google Translate
    You might think that Google Translate is a poor tool to learn a language because it is such a terrible translator at times, but you are wrong. If used in a cautious way, it is a great tool, especially at the early stages of learning a language. It gives you instant translations which you can use to communicate with a native speaker of the language you want to learn. Google Translate might not give you a grammatical translation, but most likely the speaker you communicate with will and you should focus on learning on that.

    5. Language exchange, dating websites and games
    Language exchange websites are great to find people to practice with since the people on these websites are just like you, eager to learn a language. Dating websites are also great since you do not have to advertise for a relationship, all you need is people who to communicate with and there are tons out there who are open to friendship. Games nowadays are a great way to practice a language; whether it’s a small cellphone game or a big PC game, the communication element is now huge in games today and it can be taken advantage of by language learners.

    Hope you liked this little guide, good luck!

  • Jeff

    In order to learn any language on your own, one should follow a method. The method will be outlined here but it is described in more details on the website www”.”learnlanguagesonyourown”.”com

    It is a method that I have used myself and it worked great.

    1. Determine which language to learn
    This can sound obvious to some of you, but in fact, it is a detail that is overlooked by many. When learning a language for a specific purpose, it is best to learn the variety of the language best suited to fulfill this purpose. When talking about a variety, what is usually meant is a dialect of a language, although it can be more specific than that. When learning Arabic, do you know if you should learn Maghrebi Arabic or Gulf Arabic?

    2. Find out what resources are available to you
    When choosing to learn a language, it is handy to know if you are going to have native speakers to practice with and if you’re easily going to find some websites which will help you learn the language.

    3. The time and difficulty
    Another factor that is often overlooked, the time factor. To be successful in learning a language, you need to be realistic in the amount of time you have to learn it and the amount of time it takes.

    The time factor is in direct relation to the difficulty factor. During this step, it is important to assess the level of difficulty of a language. This level of difficulty has to do with the similarities that are shared between the language(s) you speak and the language you want to learn. You need to ask yourself, are the languages related ? What features do they have in common and which features they do not and which might be difficulty to learn?

    4. Practice using Google Translate
    You might think that Google Translate is a poor tool to learn a language because it is such a terrible translator at times, but you are wrong. If used in a cautious way, it is a great tool, especially at the early stages of learning a language. It gives you instant translations which you can use to communicate with a native speaker of the language you want to learn. Google Translate might not give you a grammatical translation, but most likely the speaker you communicate with will and you should focus on learning on that.

    5. Language exchange, dating websites and games
    Language exchange websites are great to find people to practice with since the people on these websites are just like you, eager to learn a language. Dating websites are also great since you do not have to advertise for a relationship, all you need is people who to communicate with and there are tons out there who are open to friendship. Games nowadays are a great way to practice a language; whether it’s a small cellphone game or a big PC game, the communication element is now huge in games today and it can be taken advantage of by language learners.

    Hope you liked this little guide, good luck!

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