How to Be So Good They Can’t Ignore You – Free, Live Webinar with Cal Newport

Cal Newport, author of the book So Good They Can’t Ignore You, and I are going to be hosting a free, live 1-hour webinar and you’re invited to join us. We’ll be sharing more strangely useful career advice and giving away some of the insights we’ve gained building our course Top Performer, over the last three years.

Registration is free and there’s no limit to attendees, so click here to get a spot:

[The webinar is now over–we don’t have a recording, but one reader was kind enough to take extensive notes.]

The webinar will be held Sunday October 18th, 3pm CST, however you can view when that is in your timezone when you register above. We don’t plan on making a recording, so if you want to watch it will have to be live.

Here are some things we’re planning to share with you, time permitting:

  • Why being better matters–how becoming a top performer isn’t just the recipe for professional success but also professional fulfillment.
  • The science of professional expertise. How do people become world class at what they do?
  • Too many choices about what to focus on? We’ll give a process for getting answers about what exactly you should work on next.
  • Not sure how to get ahead but still stay on top of your busy life? We’ll share the productivity systems we use.
  • Not sure what you want to do with your career? There’s a systematic approach that can help you answer that question too.

Cal and I hope to see you there Sunday!

  • Nipun Mahajan

    I can’t make it for the webinar, will it be recorded?

  • Nipun Mahajan

    I can’t make it for the webinar, will it be recorded?

  • grrlpup

    Just checking: do you really mean 3pm Central Standard Time, considering that the US won’t go to Standard Time until November 1?

  • grrlpup

    Just checking: do you really mean 3pm Central Standard Time, considering that the US won’t go to Standard Time until November 1?

  • CmplxAdSys

    Sad that it won’t be recorded. Can’t make that time. 🙁

  • CmplxAdSys

    Sad that it won’t be recorded. Can’t make that time. 🙁

  • Scott Young

    Hmmm I mean central time. I think they have a timezone converter in the registration process.

  • Scott Young

    Hmmm I mean central time. I think they have a timezone converter in the registration process.

  • Jay Cross

    Hi all,

    As someone who participated in a pilot version of this course, let me say this.

    If you’re in another timezone, just stay up late. Or get up early. Do what it takes to attend the presentation.

    This course is called Top Performer. Would a top performer let the time of the webinar stop them from accessing game-changing information that would benefit them for 30+ years?

    This course was one of the best investments I’ve ever made in my career growth. (And I spend $5K-$10K/yr on personal development.)

    If future me saw past me thinking “gee, I don’t know if I can fit this in”…future me would slap past me in the head.

    That’s my $0.02.

  • Jay Cross

    Hi all,

    As someone who participated in a pilot version of this course, let me say this.

    If you’re in another timezone, just stay up late. Or get up early. Do what it takes to attend the presentation.

    This course is called Top Performer. Would a top performer let the time of the webinar stop them from accessing game-changing information that would benefit them for 30+ years?

    This course was one of the best investments I’ve ever made in my career growth. (And I spend $5K-$10K/yr on personal development.)

    If future me saw past me thinking “gee, I don’t know if I can fit this in”…future me would slap past me in the head.

    That’s my $0.02.

  • Mark Datter

    It is 2 hours before start and link to webinar says “Sorry you are late… This webinar has expired”. Hopefully it is only glitch and not serious problem. I would like to see it…

  • Mark Datter

    It is 2 hours before start and link to webinar says “Sorry you are late… This webinar has expired”. Hopefully it is only glitch and not serious problem. I would like to see it…

  • Mateusz

    I saw the same information. Is it a normal thing?

  • Mateusz

    I saw the same information. Is it a normal thing?

  • jus’ dots

    late?? damn 🙁 i dont get it thought i was right on time

  • jus’ dots

    late?? damn 🙁 i dont get it thought i was right on time

  • Yilin

    It is telling me that I am late when I opened it on time?

  • Yilin

    It is telling me that I am late when I opened it on time?

  • mon dieu

    I am also getting a message that says that I’m late

  • mon dieu

    I am also getting a message that says that I’m late

  • Scott Young

    Sorry for the errors everyone! The webinar starts in 10 minutes.

  • Mark Datter

    nevermind, it works

  • Scott Young

    Sorry for the errors everyone! The webinar starts in 10 minutes.

  • Mark Datter

    nevermind, it works

  • Fernoti

    It seems that webinarjam.net is down. I can’t even ping the website.

  • Fernoti

    It seems that webinarjam.net is down. I can’t even ping the website.

  • J.

    Looks like chat went down at the conclusion of the webinar. As promised, here are a few things that Cal and Scott have espoused…that are helpful to someone studying/training to be a physician (surgeon):

    1. Fixed-schedule productivity:

    -Used this before I’d even heard of Cal and Scott. The stress of studying for USMLE Step 1 is intense; the thing that helped me stay on track was to have an intra-day and day-to-day schedule. And…no matter what, move on to the next part of the schedule.

    2. Time-blocking:

    -Another thing that was recommended to me to help adjust to the pace/load of med school studying (vs. undergrad, where I essentially went week-to-week cramming for exams and big papers). Scott’s writing has reinforced this. Every time I stay from time-blocking, I return to it; it’s perhaps the most powerful technique I’ve found.

    -A “tweak” of the time-blocking technique I’ve found useful: grading myself on how efficient/focused I was during that 50-90 min period (0% = not at all; 100% = completely). It’s a simple yet powerful accountability measure, as well as a way to check in with oneself – is my focus tapering off? Am I hitting diminishing returns?

    3. Deliberate practice:

    -From a surgical standpoint, this is especially important – how do we get as much out of our exposure to surgery and opportunities to do cases? One tricky thing (compared to the musicians profiled in a prior article of Cal’s): we don’t have the luxury of “practicing” within such a relaxed schedule. We’re also taking care of patients, battling sleep deprivation, and so on. I have some thoughts on tailoring the deliberate practice to surgical training; those go beyond the scope of this comment. But a key component is focusing on specific sub-components of a given procedure and modality (i.e., open vs minimally invasive) while at the same time balancing pressure and obligation to improve efficiency (being technically better while ALSO being faster) n the OR.

    4. FOCUS:
    -See above re: time-blocking
    -Cal and Scott are correct re: Facebook. My challenge to you: is the time that you’re spending on FB or, dare I say, self-improvement blogs, really worth the life-benefit you’re getting out of said activity? That’s perhaps a benefit of a course like Top Performer – it’s structured, it’s a program with a timeframe/timeline. You don’t have to endlessly search the ‘net to find what you’re looking for…and probably get distracted and side-tracked in the process. A benefit to investing in a course is that you can focus on the course and move forward in a way that you can’t by skimming and bouncing around blog entries.

    The best (only?) site I’ve seen that discusses learning/performance enhancement for med students and residents/fellows is http://wellnessrounds.org/

    Anyway, hope that’s helpful! Lots more where that came from but gotta get back to studying/researching/prepping. To those of you at the early stages of the journey, know that it’s just that – a journey, and each *huge, earth-shattering* thing you do (e.g., MCAT!) is just another step toward becoming a doc.

  • J.

    Looks like chat went down at the conclusion of the webinar. As promised, here are a few things that Cal and Scott have espoused…that are helpful to someone studying/training to be a physician (surgeon):

    1. Fixed-schedule productivity:

    -Used this before I’d even heard of Cal and Scott. The stress of studying for USMLE Step 1 is intense; the thing that helped me stay on track was to have an intra-day and day-to-day schedule. And…no matter what, move on to the next part of the schedule.

    2. Time-blocking:

    -Another thing that was recommended to me to help adjust to the pace/load of med school studying (vs. undergrad, where I essentially went week-to-week cramming for exams and big papers). Scott’s writing has reinforced this. Every time I stay from time-blocking, I return to it; it’s perhaps the most powerful technique I’ve found.

    -A “tweak” of the time-blocking technique I’ve found useful: grading myself on how efficient/focused I was during that 50-90 min period (0% = not at all; 100% = completely). It’s a simple yet powerful accountability measure, as well as a way to check in with oneself – is my focus tapering off? Am I hitting diminishing returns?

    3. Deliberate practice:

    -From a surgical standpoint, this is especially important – how do we get as much out of our exposure to surgery and opportunities to do cases? One tricky thing (compared to the musicians profiled in a prior article of Cal’s): we don’t have the luxury of “practicing” within such a relaxed schedule. We’re also taking care of patients, battling sleep deprivation, and so on. I have some thoughts on tailoring the deliberate practice to surgical training; those go beyond the scope of this comment. But a key component is focusing on specific sub-components of a given procedure and modality (i.e., open vs minimally invasive) while at the same time balancing pressure and obligation to improve efficiency (being technically better while ALSO being faster) n the OR.

    4. FOCUS:
    -See above re: time-blocking
    -Cal and Scott are correct re: Facebook. My challenge to you: is the time that you’re spending on FB or, dare I say, self-improvement blogs, really worth the life-benefit you’re getting out of said activity? That’s perhaps a benefit of a course like Top Performer – it’s structured, it’s a program with a timeframe/timeline. You don’t have to endlessly search the ‘net to find what you’re looking for…and probably get distracted and side-tracked in the process. A benefit to investing in a course is that you can focus on the course and move forward in a way that you can’t by skimming and bouncing around blog entries.

    The best (only?) site I’ve seen that discusses learning/performance enhancement for med students and residents/fellows is http://wellnessrounds.org/

    Anyway, hope that’s helpful! Lots more where that came from but gotta get back to studying/researching/prepping. To those of you at the early stages of the journey, know that it’s just that – a journey, and each *huge, earth-shattering* thing you do (e.g., MCAT!) is just another step toward becoming a doc.

  • Darwin Lo

    I missed the webinar but am still interested in signing up for the course. Where can I get the course details?

  • Darwin Lo

    I missed the webinar but am still interested in signing up for the course. Where can I get the course details?

  • Scott Young
  • Scott Young

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