What We’ve Learned from Top Performer: Free Lesson Series

Cal Newport and I have worked the last three years on developing Top Performer, a course in applying the insights of deliberate practice to becoming really good at your work. This process has taken us through years of pilot classes and experiments–all trying to figure out what is the best method for rapidly crafting the skills you need to have a career you love.

For the few of you who don’t know Cal, he’s a professor of computer science at Georgetown University, MIT PhD alum and author of five books, including So Good They Can’t Ignore You and Deep Work. Cal’s work has had enormous influence on my own life, and I suspect he has he has had a similar impact on many of yours.

As we get ready for the next session of Top Performer, Cal and I wanted to put together a special series of lessons sharing some of the best insights from working with thousands of professionals in different fields and career stages in previous iterations of the course. This will be a private lesson series, available only to those who subscribe to either of our mailing lists.

If you sign up now (completely free), you’ll get the first lesson in the two-week series starting on Monday, May 2nd. The goal is to give you some of the best tools and strategies we’ve found for mastering your career that you can take action on now. Once the series concludes, we’ll be opening Top Performer again for a new session.

Click here to get the lessons delivered straight to your inbox: https://www.scotthyoung.com/blog/newsletter/

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  • Anatoli

    Hi Scott,

    Anders Ericsson has done a great research and described all his “best insights” from studying top performers for more than 30 years in his book “Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise”.

    To what extend would your lessons differ from those in the Anders’ book?

  • Anatoli

    Hi Scott,

    Anders Ericsson has done a great research and described all his “best insights” from studying top performers for more than 30 years in his book “Peak: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise”.

    To what extend would your lessons differ from those in the Anders’ book?

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